NFL Draft 2013: Potential Seattle fits going into Day 3

USA TODAY Sports

Here's a look at 40 prospects who could be fits for Seattle on day 3. These aren't necessarily ranked in accordance with our Matrix grades, but instead are more specific to Seattle's current needs.

Khaseem Greene
OLB
Rutgers
Sr
6'1
241

Thick, powerful frame with long arms and good muscular definition. Explosive tackler with a knack for stripping the football. Physical and at times devastating hitter who closes quickly on plays in front of him. Doesn't have the elite first step, but accelerates extremely well. Fluid drop in zone, but tends to react late to passes. Appears to be more effective up on the line of scrimmage vs. the run and on delayed blitzes. Strong awareness against the run. Good balance and use of leverage as well as hands and arm length to stay clean at the 2nd level.

Quick hands to disengage. Closes on target and wraps up well. Drives his target backward, and is emphatic in the way that he tackles. Played a large amount of zone coverage at Rutgers, and exhibited good awareness and ability to locate ball in man coverage situations. Doesn't appear to be a burner. Susceptible to look-offs, and will at times be out of position on the outside. Looks to be effective as an inside 'backer, considering that's primarily where he played at Rutgers. Good special teams player. Always around the ball. A converted safety with a history of picking the ball off. Need to see better awareness against the pass. 2011 Big East Defensive Player of the year and posted 125 tackles, 10.5 TFLs, 5.5 sacks and a whopping 6 forced fumbles in 2012.

Sanders Commings
CB
Georgia
Sr
6'0
208

Scouts have varying opinions on Commings, but considering Seattle’s press-heavy scheme, there may not be a better fit for the ‘Hawks defensive backfield in this draft, outside of the first round. The former Georgia Bulldog is as disruptive as any corner in the class when asked to come up and jam receivers at the line, and exhibits fluid hips when flipping from a backpedal to go vertical. He also displays strong recognition and anticipation to keep stride-for-stride on underneath routes, and puts his long arms to good use in extending to break up the pass, or when shedding downfield blockers against the run.

He’s not a “stop-on-a-dime” athlete with a whole lot of suddenness to his game, so he has struggled from time to time in situations where he’s been asked to play off, or come back to the ball once he has committed vertically. Ultimately, Commings is a very good press corner who plays with the level of physicality that Seattle loves, can defend the run, and may be able to contribute on the inside as well considering how quickly he can get his hips around and move across the field without losing a step. As for where Commings best fits, he’d be an immediate competitor for the 3rd outside CB role (behind Sherman/Browner), and has the skill-set to compete for an eventual take-over of Brandon Browner’s current starting spot.

Da'Rick Rogers
WR
Tennessee Tech
Jr
6'3
217

Had Rogers remained at Tennessee, he may be a top-20 consideration this year. He's big, agile, has strong hands, plays a physical brand of ball, and is fluid as a route-runner. Personal issues and inconsistencies have plagued him in his career, but there's no denying the upside, and I don't see him slipping past the 3rd round.

Shamarko Thomas
SS
Syracuse
Sr
5'9
213

Thomas is one of my favorite safeties in the draft. He's a dynamic and explosive downhill tackler who can really disrupt the run, both plugging holes up the middle, and flying to the sideline to cut off the outside run. He's fluid in coverage and often times came up to cover the slot, one-on-one while at Syracuse. Loves the big hit and displays good read-and-react diagnostics to meet the ball at the receiver and break up the play. He'll bite on the fake at times and is susceptible to letting one get behind him occasionally, but he's fast and agile enough to stay with receivers vertically and exhibits some natural ability in press-coverage when asked to come up and jam. May be the most versatile safety outside of the first round. Like with any smaller safety (5'9) who plays as physical as Thomas does, there will be concerns about his ability to physically hold up long term, at the next level.

Quinton Patton
WR
Louisiana Tech
Sr
6'1
202

Patton has a lot of very strong traits, though none you would consider "elite." Where he's best is after the catch. He's shifty and explosive in a short area and will make defenders miss in the open field. He does a good job of using his size and long arms to release versus press coverage, and exhibits flexible hips to sink and break suddenly as a route-runner. Despite his sub-4.5 40 time, Patton doesn't consistently pull away at the 2nd level and is susceptible to being slowed by bumps and contact down field. He plucks the ball nicely off his body and does a good job of securing it before turning up field. If he can learn to put his speed to better use vertically, he'll have the potential to be a No. 1 or No. 2 at the next level, but as of now, Patton looks like an immediate slot/3rd option who can sit down in space and extend plays after the catch.

Dion Sims
TE
Michigan State
Jr
6'5
285

Sims is a natural athlete with impressive speed and agility for his size. He can run all the routes, and catches the ball with his hands routinely. Despite his size, he seems to lack durability and toughness, having suffered several injuries over the course of his career. he's not a dynamic blocker, and has struggled with weight issues as well. Some teams probably have Sims off their board until at least the 4th round, due to some of these concerns, but he's as athletic as any TE in the group and could be a prolific receiver at the next level.

Montori Hughes
DT
Tennessee -Martin
Sr
6'4
328

Long, well-distributed frame with balanced upper and lower halves. Flashes quick hands with a rapid arm-over swim. Good balance to stay afoot through gaps and when sandwiched between blockers, exhibits strong effort to finish penetration. Good run awareness and timing to disengage on his target. An effective wrap-up tackler who plays with a high level of physicality on contact.

Fluid and agile when asked to change direction in space. Exhibits quick hands that transition nicely to power on contact, when swatting or clubbing. Gets upright far too often and is stood up regularly when he isn't able to work in space. There are many character questions with Hughes in the wake of several suspensions and an ultimate dismissal at Tennessee. Best suited as a 5-technique where initial space will allow him to generate low leverage and first-step burst to either penetrate or set the edge with a strong bull-rush. A high-2nd round talent who will probably fall due character concerns.

Jesse Williams
DT
Alabama
Sr
6'3
320

Anchors well, and exhibits raw natural power on contact to compensate for inconsistent lower-half bend. High motor athlete who fights relentlessly to the whistle. A bit stiff in the hips, and lacks natural agility to cover significant ground laterally. Good backfield vision and awareness. Not the athlete of the other three, but superior natural power and ability to establish leverage consistently put him in position to make plays against the run. Primarily a run-stopper, who lacks explosive first step and quickness to consistently get up field, but good closing burst straight-ahead when in the clear. Doesn't break down extremely well in space and struggles to change direction once he gets going one way. Won't blow by anyone off the snap, but could be one of the league's best run-stuffing tackles considering what he's shown in terms of being able to utilize his brute strength to generate a bull rush.

Ryan Swope
WR
Texas A&M
Sr.
6'1
205

Positives: Sturdy frame with long arms and good muscular definition. Exhibits strong initial burst off the snap. Flexible hips to sink, burst and separate across the field. Displays strong awareness and anticipation of zone windows, and exhibits suddenness to flip, sit and locate the ball. Plucks the ball routinely, then looks it in and secures it before turning upfield. Fearless over the middle, and looks to extend plays after the catch. Possesses quick, agile feet and has a knack for shaking coverage with jukes and stabs.

Shows strong awareness of mismatches with linebackers and safeties, and possesses the 2nd level acceleration to beat either one. Tracks the ball well vertically, and adjusts his body nicely to throws off his frame. Effective 2nd-level cut-blocker when asked to support the run or quick WR screens. Consistently gives good effort to the whistle. Does not shy away from contact after the catch and flashes some power on contact to drag a defender.

Negatives: Struggles to break down and redirect rapidly, particularly when asked to plant and burst out of a pivot on underneath routes. Could be more physical against press, as he doesn’t always utilize his solid frame to create space like he could. Isn’t a real “burner”, and relies more on quickness and fakes to create separation vertically. Will sit down and wait for the throw at times rather than drive back to the ball. Doesn’t possess a huge “catch radius” and isn’t a guy you can necessarily just throw it up to and rely on to go get it.

Compares to: Brandon Stokley, WR, Denver Broncos – I look at Swope as a bigger, more athletic version of the veteran Stokely, but similar in terms of route-running efficiency, smarts, and craftiness in creating vertical separation. Although there are more athletic, explosive receivers in this year’s group, few are more refined and ready to contribute than Swope, who probably falls somewhere between rounds 2 and 4, but is capable of putting up first-round numbers in the right offense. Has been designated by many as a pure “slot” target at the next level, but I see some tools that suggest he could be effective on the outside as well.

*David Bakhtiari
OT
Colorado
Jr.
6'4
299

Bakhtiari is a technically sound lineman who routinely establishes a wide base, displays good use of leverage, gets his arms extended and avoids over-extending on contact. He does a good job of generating power from his lower half as a run blocker, and routinely keeps his frame clean with good use of his long arms. Lacks ideal fluidity when sliding, and comes off as "heavy" when opposing speed rushers off the edge, particularly when he's not able to establish contact early in the play. Bakhtiari is most likely a right tackle at the next level considering his ability to anchor the bull rush, or could be moved inside where he's given more of a "box" to play within.

Brian Schwenke
OL
California
Sr.
6'3
314

Schwenke isn't the athlete or massive body that many of his fellow classmates are, but he has impressive short-area quickness, good flexibility and sinks well on contact to anchor and establish leverage against powerful D-tackles. Surprisingly light footed moving laterally, for his size.

David Quessenberry
OL
San Jose State
Sr.
6'5
302

A natural athlete and former tight end, who exhibits light feet and nice agility when asked to mirror rushers in space. Quick off the snap and to the 2nd level as a run-blocker. Anticipates opponent change-of-direction well, and when able to get his arms extended, exhibits impressive pop on contact. Light feet allow him to neutralize the bull rush, as he does a nice job of keeping them moving on contact.

Needs to add some muscle, particularly if he's going to play on the interior at the next level, as he simply doesn't possess the natural strength to compensate for his lack of girth. Comes off the line too upright, and is easily knocked back when he does. Absorbs too much impact with his chest or shoulder, and at times will drop his head when engaging defenders in space. Exhibits only marginal fluidity in space, and wastes motion when asked to break down and redirect. Doesn't target decisively on the run, and lacks commitment when faced with multiple rushers.

Brandon Jenkins
OLB
Florida State
Sr.
6'3
251

Jenkins possesses a long, lanky frame with ideal proportion throughout. Comes off the ball with an explosive first step, and does a good job of getting into his opponent's chest quickly, and establishing leverage. Exhibits flexibility to drop his shoulder and flatten at the edge, and maintains surge around the edge, with strong closing burst once he disengages. Is relentless in his pursuit and does a good job of shrugging off his blocker once he does round the corner. Flashes strong, quick hands to swat and chop his blocker and create space. Impressive punch with the ability to knock back considerably bigger opponents. Uses length well to disengage against the run, and exhibits good backfield vision to track the runner through the trees.

Flashes a swim move back to the inside, and exhibits suddenness to change direction in doing so. Comes off the line high at times and is easily handled when he fails to establish low leverage. Isn't ideally built to play a traditional end position, considering his shorter, lighter frame, and he's a completely different player (for the worse) when he engages too high. Hasn't played a lot in space in terms of dropping and reading the quarterback as a coverage 'backer, so may be considered a "tweener" with too little experience to have an immediate impact in a more traditional linebacker role. Injuries have made him tough to grade as of late, and it will be interesting to see if those injuries have effected his greatest assets as a pass-rusher - first-step explosion, ability to gain leverage with flexibility, and speed to close.

Lavar Edwards
DE
LSU
Jr.
6'3
272

Edwards has been overshadowed by the flashier Mingo and Montgomery at LSU, but he certainly has nothing to hang his head about. He's a guy I consider to be a real potential steal between rounds 3 and 5, as I see one of the more well-rounded, balanced ends in the entire class.He doesn't possess an elite first step, but it's certainly not bad, and unlike Montgomery and Mingo, consistently gets his arms extended to create the space he needs to maneuver to the QB or running back.

He's patient and disciplined as a run defender, and always seems to know what's going on around him. He's impressively powerful on contact for his size and is capable of setting the edge consistently on either side of the line, regardless of his blocker's size. He routinely establishes low leverage, and exhibits a strong closing burst in space. He may not have the rubber-band flexibility of guys like Mingo or Carradine, but his active hands and plus awareness put him in position to make disruptive plays against both the run and pass.

Lonnie Pryor
RB
Florida State
Sr.
6'0
227

Pryor is an athletic 'back who looks like a traditional tailback but plays with the instincts, toughness and solid blocking fundamentals of a traditional lead-blocking fullback. Can make plays as a pass-catcher, exhibiting soft hands, and good burst from a turn-up. Is a versatile back who can carry in short yardage situations and exhibits decent vision for lanes and holes as a runner.

Kyle Juszczyk
FB
Harvard
Sr.
6'1
248

The Harvard alum is built like a traditional lead-blocking fullback, but is surprisingly quick and fluid as a route-runner, also displaying coordination and soft hands as a receiver. NFL teams may not really know where to put him, so he could slide or go undrafted as a result, particularly due to the lower level of competition in the Ivy league. But the natural catching ability and blocking power could intrigue a team looking for more versatility in their backfield.

Omoregie Uzzi
OL
Georgia Tech
Sr.
6'3
305

STRENGTHS: Explosive, quick athlete for his size. Comes off the ball fast, and displays athleticism to get to the second level quickly. Adjusts nicely on the run to pickup incoming defenders. Establishes low leverage effectively to anchor against the bull rush. Effective cut-blocker - something he did with great regularity in Georgia Tech's run-heavy system.
Impact pass-blocker when he's able to get his arms extended and hands inside his opponents' pads. Flashes a light, fluid kick-slide in protection, and exhibits suddenness to redirect with rusher. Quick, punchy hands to keep rushers out of his chest. Possesses good flexibility in his lower half. Strong initial pop on contact to knock his opponent back. Targets decisively and is able to engage and disengage consecutive opponents without losing momentum on the run.

WEAKNESSES: Only average size for the position. Much more of a "quick" athlete than a powerful one, and is susceptible to the bull rush if he plants his feet. Doesn't consistently absorb impact with his lower half, and will try to out-muscle his opponent too frequently. Will stop moving his feet in pass-protection and seemingly allow defenders to run right by him. Seems that the game is simply moving too fast for him in passing situations at times, and struggles to be decisive on blitz pickups. Overextends frequently off the line - sometimes by design when cut-blocking, other times he simply bends at the waist and loses his footing.

COMPARES TO: Jahri Evans, OG, New Orleans Saints - Though a bit smaller than Evans, Uzzi's instincts, strength and athleticism as a run-blocker remind me of the three-time All Pro, and the two even appear to share some of the same struggles as pass-blockers. Like Evans in 2006, I could see Uzzi flying under the radar for the first few rounds considering Georgia Tech's limited offense, but he too could prove to be a steal as an immediate-impact run blocker with Day One starting potential.

Matt Scott
QB
Arizona
Sr.
6'2
213

Scott's combination of athleticism and arm strength are intriguing and have drawn comparisons to Russell Wilson. Scott doesn't have the starting experience that Wilson did coming out of school, and his mechanics aren't nearly as consistent, but there are flashes that do remind me of the Wisconsin alum. I have Scott as one of my biggest sleepers in the crop, as he routinely made good decisions, displayed nice accuracy and a clear ability to make all the throws both from the pocket and on the run. Probably a 3rd or 4th round pick, but with late-1st round ability.

Chris Harper
WR
Kansas State
Sr.
6'1
229
Harper is one of my favorite WRs in the class. He's probably the most physically imposing of the group in terms of pure muscular build and strength. He's not the precise, fluid route runner who can stop or cut on a dime and shake defenders with regularity, but he exhibits an understanding and knack for using his body to seal off defenders and beat you with his physicality. He tracks the deep ball well, possesses strong hands and good coordination, and exhibits good body control and timing with going up for the jump ball. An underrated pass-catcher who could surprise and play a significant role his first year.

Khaled Holmes
C
USC
Sr.
6'3
302

Holmes is an athletic, quick lineman with surprising raw power for his size. He's athletic, agile and instinctive enough to play any of the three interior positions, and could be a surprise early 3rd-day pick considering this versatility. Does get over-powered at times when he comes off the snap high, but has the natural flexibility to become a consistent bender and leverage winner at the next level.

Trevardo Williams
OLB
Connecticut
Sr.
6'1
241

Explosive athlete with natural edge-rush ability. Extremely quick get-off to go with flexibility that makes him a consistent threat to round the edge on every play. Big-time closing burst in space. Exhibits an impressive lateral quickness when countering back to the inside from the edge. May have the best pure get-off of anyone edge rusher in this year's class. Relentless motor to the whistle. Exhibits acceleration to track down the stretch play from the backside. Consistently creates space with good arm extension and impressive punch to his opponent's chestplate. Makes good use of flexibility to generate low leverage at the edge.

Possesses elite straight-line speed for an 'end, and is "plus" in this area among linebackers. Is under-sized for a traditional 3-point edge rusher, but hasn't shown a lot in terms of lining up as a traditional linebacker either. Lacks power necessary to consistently generate any kind of bull-rush and is a pure speed rusher who has to rely heavily on his get-off to make the edge. Flashes a secondary move from time to time, but needs to continue to develop a repertoire if he's going to consistently contribute pressure at the next level. Doesn't exhibit a high level of awareness or instincts as a run defender and may be a one-trick pony.

Rarely drops back into coverage, so is tough to grade in space. Williams has put up some intriguing sack numbers at the college level (11.5 in '12) despite lacking the size and strength that scouts want to see in an every-down rusher in the NFL. Interest should be strong from a 3-4 team willing to bank on the chance that Williams can be just as effective rushing from a 2-point stance, as he's been with his hand in the ground. A legitimate double-digit sack threat in the right system, who's upside could be more like Bruce Irvin, year one.

Malliciah Goodman
DE
Clemson
Sr.
6'4
272

Goodman is known for his powerful frame and long arms, and possesses better-than-average get-off for his size. Guys like John Schneider salivate at athletes with this combination of speed and length, and Goodman has shown flashes of brilliance at times coming off the edge at Clemson. Where he needs to improve is in putting his powerful hands and long arms to use, to create a clean path to the QB and get better push with his bull-rush, and to set the edge against the run.

While Goodman does a good job of funneling the run back inside with his extension and push, he's not always as good at disengaging and closing on the play, which simply isn't good enough for a guy of his length. He's stiff in space, and wastes a lot of motion when changing direction, so he'll need to rely more on his length than most guys, in order to compensate for such limitations. His combination of "plus" explosiveness of the snap for his size, and flexibility to turn the corner should be an immediate strong-side upgrade for several 4-3 teams in terms of getting a pass-rush from that side, and if he can learn to use his naturally powerful arms and hands more frequently, he could be much more disruptive than he currently is, in both facets of the game.

Eric Herman
OG
Ohio
Sr.
6'4
318

Herman is an intriguing small-school prospect who plays with surprising fluidity for his size, and a mean temperament. He looked dominant at times in school where he exhibited explosive power on contact, impressive agility, and strong awareness both as a run blocker and pass protector. He plays a bit "wild" at times in that he seems to be more determined to obliterate his opponent than execute his assignment with any kind of precision. He can get a bit "grabby" and/or "huggy" at times too, so he'll need to dial back the intensity a bit and focus on improving his technique. There's no doubt that Herman presents an intriguing package to a team looking for a developmental, versatile interior lineman who can both overpower defenders at the point of attack, and get down field as a run blocker. Breaks down and redirects pretty well on the move, and displays a sudden, quick first step off the snap.

Jeff Baca
OL
UCLA
Sr.
6'4
302

POSITIVES: Displays light, nimble feet when asked to absorb the bull-rush, and does a good job of bending his lower half to anchor. Exhibits impressive upper-half flexibility and core strength to twist his torso and hold off angular penetrators.
Extremely physical at the point of attack, displaying strong pop on contact, and routinely punches to the whistle. Consistently establishes a wide base in pass protection, and maintains it throughout the play. Keeps his feet moving on contact, and exhibits a strong effort play in and play out.

Shows good burst off the line and through traffic when asked to get to the second level, and displays awareness to anticipate defenders and square up in space.

Versatile lineman who earned significant starts at tackle and guard in college, and even took a few snaps at center.

NEGATIVES: Isn't a great athlete. Displays heavy feet laterally, and has a tendency to get too upright when dropping into pass protection. Lacks suddenness to change direction rapidly and must rely on contact to slow his opponent and compensate for average foot quickness. Despite possessing a strong punch, is unable to consistently move opponents with it. More aggressive and physical than he is powerful. Retracts his arms on contact and allows the defender into his frame too often.

Alvin Bailey
OG
Arkansas
Jr.
6'3
312

Bailey is a good-looking athlete with ideal thickness and proportion throughout. Possesses raw power to move bigger opponents on contact, comes off the ball with natural explosion, and can get down the field rapidly as a run blocker. It's when he's asked to move laterally or break down and redirect where his limitations are apparent. An ideal depth fit at guard in a power-run scheme at the next level.

Ricky Wagner
OT
Wisconsin
Sr.
6'6
308

Wagner is another huge man with length and athleticism that scouts covet at tackle. His biggest struggles have come against the speedier, quick rushers who counter and re-direct suddenly coming off the edge. Technically, Wagner is a good technician who maintains wide base and good bend, while extending his long arms to keep his opponent off his frame. He comes off the snap with good initial burst as a run blocker and can square up and adjust while on the fly with surprising control considering his body type. One of my sleepers who I think could make a move to the right side and be extremely reliable as a starter relatively quickly.

Chase Thomas
LB
Stanford
Sr.
6'3
244

Love the energy and passion that Thomas plays with. Extremely heady and aware of his surroundings. As a pass-rusher, exhibits good flexibility at the edge to make the corner, maintain balance and close. Good use of hands on contact, and consistently gets arms extended to keep blockers at bay. Exhibits adequate quickness to rush outside or in from the edge. First step is not elite, but consistently gets off the ball with good timing.

Extremely versatile - consistently rushes from either edge, and can drop back from middle or outside 'backer spot, and cover. Isn't extremely quick laterally, and struggles to break down and redirect when mirroring the ball carrier. Doesn't explode out of breaks or stops, and possesses only marginal lateral agility. Technically, Thomas is as sound as any linebacker coming out. His size is appealing in any one of the traditional LB spots, but probably translates best as a strong side or middle 'backer in a 4-3, while providing versatility to put his hand in the ground or rush from a stand on passing downs. Looks as though he belongs on the field on any down.

Tony Jefferson
FS
Oklahoma
Sr.
5'11
213

Jefferson is one of the better deep safeties in the draft when it comes to covering sideline-to-sideline. He's fluid in his backpedal, possesses a strong initial step, and exhibits good ball skills. He can line up in the slot and cover receivers with his fluid hips and agility, and he takes good angles against the run. He's not as physical or dynamic of a tackler as some of the other safeties in the class, and simply misses too many opportunities due to dropping his head or attempting to tackle too high. A pure free safety at this point, who could upgrade an NFL secondary with his "plus" coverage ability.

Reid Fragel
OT
Ohio State
Sr.
6'8
308

Long, well-proportioned frame with muscular upper and lower halves. Establishes a wide, solid base in pass protection and displays impressive hand power on contact. Exhibits straight-ahead suddenness off the line when targeting through to the 2nd level, and generates power on contact to move his opponent. Laterally he's extremely limited and will have to continue to add strength to his upper half if he's going to rely heavily on his hands at the next level, as he's simply not fluid or quick enough to shut off the edge. Struggles to handle counter moves or any change of direction if he doesn't have hands on his opponent. A backup right tackle at the next level with a possibility of moving to guard if he can add more muscle.

Nick Kasa
TE
Colorado
Sr.
6'6
260

Positives : Thick, muscular and athletic-looking frame with long arms and well-proportioned upper and lower halves. Better athlete than given credit for, displaying good initial burst and quickness off the line, with the ability to get up to speed rapidly. Burst off the line gives him ability to line up at in the slot as a receiver, but natural hand power and lower-half bend enable him to step in as traditional TE and take on opposing D-linemen. Exhibits some suddenness in and out of breaks and possesses the flexibility to be a smooth, clean route-runner. Former Defensive End with good blocking instinct when taking on opposing ‘ends.

Possesses good 2nd level acceleration to get behind linebackers and stretch the seam. Can pull away once he gets going, and has surprising top-end football speed for his size, despite the 4.71 40-time which he plays faster than on tape. Despite limited experience as a receiver, makes a concerted effort to catch the ball with his hands, and does display natural absorption and coordination when securing the ball off his frame. Has natural ability to be an elite blocker at the position as he exhibits good lower-half bend and strong pop on contact. Displays an awareness for how to utilize his length and size in tight coverage, to seal off defenders and secure the ball.

Negatives: Inexperience as a receiver is most noticeable when asked to get his head around and locate the football, as the ball tends to arrive before he’s looking at times. Doesn’t always secure the ball before turning up field and is susceptible to having it jarred loose by the big hit, or even dropping it pre-contact. When facing his QB, has a tendency to “clap” or “hug” the ball to his chest rather than extending his arms and plucking the ball. As a blocker, does a good job of getting his arms extended, but will stop moving his feet and is susceptible to swims, clubs or arm-overs as a result.

Summary: Kasa may have more upside than any other tight-end in the draft, in terms of his athleticism and when considering how new he is to the position. There isn’t any one area where he lacks the natural ability to eventually be really good, and although he’s raw, could be an immediate contributor with his versatility to move around and contribute both as a blocker and a receiver from multiple spots.

Xavier Nixon
OT
Florida
Sr.
6'6
321

Nixon is a massive man with surprising fluidity and athleticism for his size. He shifts direction smoothly and suddenly when asked to mirror and re-direct in his kick-slide, and he's quick off the line both as a pass-protector and when kicking out to run block.

He displays a consistent wide base, and transfers impact to his lower half on contact, exhibiting good lower half flexibility and core strength. He will get too upright off the snap and can be pushed back as a result, often having to rely on his light, quick feet to recover and re-set. One of the better athletes in the class at the position, but at this point is more "finesse" than strength or power, and will need to turn up the agression to be a regular at the next level.

Aaron Mellette
WR
Elon
Sr.
6'3
217

Mellette is a case of a guy with a clear understanding of how to best put his size to use, but who lacks a lot of refinement otherwise. He lacks suddenness as a route runner and struggles to cut sharply when asked to dig, comeback or flatten to the sideline, and he certainly won't beat you with speed. Where he's as good as anyone in the class, though, is in using his body to seal off defenders, timing his jump to reach the high-point, and securing the ball off his frame. He's a "post-up" receiver who could be an immediate red-zone upgrade for a team, with potential of becoming a bit more regular if he's to improve as a route runner and learn to separate with some consistency. Comes off the line sluggish, and as a result can get swallowed up by press.

*Josh Boyce
WR
TCU
Jr.
5'11
206

Boyce is a tough competitor who possesses a thick, long-armed frame and good athleticism. He's a bit stiff-hipped and will round off routes at times, and needs to learn to take advantage of his strength better when facing the jam on the outside as he tends to rely solely on his feet which are only marginally quick. He'll compete for the ball and isn't afraid of contact after the catch, often extending plays with his toughness. His struggles to get off the snap and separate on the outside will probably limit him to a slot role, at least initially, at the next level. But he does possess length and natural strength that suggest he could develop into an outside target down the road. Strong, reliable hands, but needs to avoid the body catches.

Jelanie Jenkins
OLB
Florida
Jr.
6'1
243

Strong combo of speed/quickness and flexibility. Agile to dodge blockers and meander his way to his target. Avoids blocks more with quickness than hands, but needs to learn to shed better when engaged as he has a tendency to get swallowed up. Early play recognition. Biggest weakness is that he takes shallow angles to the outside, and often ends up behind the play as a result.

Doesn't explode to the football like he should consistently. Good closing burst, but only average first step. Fluid drop, but will get his hips around too quickly in zone and leave the underneath empty. Good wrap-up tackler who establishes low position, both on blocks and on tackles. Good instincts/awareness/athleticism. Bad angles, and isn't physical enough. Aggression waynes, but when he turns it on, can be explosive.

Jordan Mills
OT
Louisiana Tech
Sr.
6'5
316

STRENGTHS: Mills possesses ideal length and frame to play tackle at the next level. Absorbs impact with his lower half, and rarely looks caught off guard by the bull rush. Consistently gets his hands inside the pads of his opponent, and flashes the ability to manhandle when he does so. Flexible hips allow for him to generate good leverage at the point of attack.

Consistently gets his arms extended and manages to routinely keep his frame clean as a pass-blocker. Exhibits bend and flexibility to adjust to defenders at the 2nd level, and when he's able to square up, has devastating capabilities as a run-blocker.

WEAKNESSES: Is not a fluid athlete in space, and appears best suited to play the strong-side where his strength and power should help him compensate for heavy feet and lateral limitations. Comes off the snap high at times as a run blocker, and is too easily pushed back.Is easily beat to the edge by speed rushers when he's not able to create early contact and control his opponent. Can appear sluggish off the snap when asked to break out and set blocks in space.

Compares to: Ray Willis, OT, Kansas City Chiefs - Mills reminds me of Willis in that although he lacks the natural fluidity and athleticism to make it as a blind-side protector at the next level, his anchoring strength and natural power could translate to success on the strong side. He has the look of a mid-round selection with starter upside at right tackle within a couple of years, particularly if placed in a power-run scheme.

Oday Aboushi
OT
Virginia
Sr.
6'6
308

Aboushi isn't the athlete that some of the other tackle prospects are, but he's extremely physical and exhibits impressive natural strength to compensate for heavy feet. He does keep his feet moving on contact though, and does a good job of getting his arms extended consistently and generating a strong pop to his opponent.

He's not a natural bender and will get stood up at times by the bull rush, but he moves his feet well and possesses core strength to recover. His aggression will go overboard at times, resulting in personal foul penalties, so he needs to learn to pull back and play with better emotional control. May be an intriguing guard option considering his lack of agility, but he looks capable of holding down an NFL right tackle spot considering his natural anchoring strength and hand power.

Bacarri Rambo
FS
Georgia
Sr.
6'1
211

Despite a couple of failed drug tests while at Georgia and a suspension that came as a result, Rambo is one of the most dynamic and physical safeties in this year's group. His explosive first step and strong awareness enable him to cover ground quickly as a pass defender, and he exhibits impressive attack on the ball in the air.

He can come up in the box and lay wood against the run, and he's fluid enough to cover tight ends and some receivers 1-on-1. He's a bit wreckless at times, often abandoning sound tackling technique and instead throwing himself at his target or leading with his head, but he's a fierce hitter who will bring an intimidating presence to an NFL secondary. That is, if he can keep himself out of trouble off the field.

Tavarris King
WR
Georgia
Sr.
6'1
189

I watch King, and I love the speed and agility that he brings, to go with impressive length at 6'1. However, while a good athlete, he doesn't play with a degree of physicality that would suggest he's ready to man-up with press-corners at the next level, and he's not a guy who I would want to send over the middle very often due to his seemingly frail build. Is there a place for him at the next level? I think so. I could see him being highly effective from the slot where he could put his speed and quickness to use on deep outs and seam routes. Good hands, and clean route-runner.

William Gholston
DE
Michigan State
Sr.
6'7
280

Gholston possesses a massive frame with surprising quickness and burst off the line. He's not very consistent in terms of his timing off the snap and doesn't have the strongest closing burst, but he also possesses raw power that has helped him compensate for these deficiencies, and does flash the ability to over-power opponents with his size and strength. He finished 2012 with 4.5 sacks, 13 tackles for loss, and 10, yes that's right, 10 passes batted down.

While Gholston hasn't lived up to all the expectations, he certainly has been an impact player, and possesses the size and athleticism to be one at the next level as well. Ideally, his best fit is as a strong-side, 5-technique end in a 4-3, but could move inside on passing downs, and could hold his own as a 3-4 end as well.He flashes quick get-off for his size, nice hand power, and better-than-expected lateral agility to beat blocks in pursuit. Could be another potential steal if he drops past round 3.

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You can find more of Derek's analysis at his Seahawks-centric draft, free agency, & pro player personnel site called "ScoutTheSeahawks." Head over and bookmark it - he maintains a really great free agent tracker in addition to his Draft focus that is much more in-depth than most places because of his background doing deep scouting of NFL Draft prospects.

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